Access to prenatal, delivery, and newborn care among undocumented Hispanics in the Memphis area.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • The purpose of this study was to examine the prenatal, delivery, and newborn care received by undocumented Hispanics in the Memphis area. The focus was to sketch a demographic profile of this population, identify barriers encountered in obtaining prenatal, delivery and newborn care, and present a five-year projection of the demand for prenatal care for this population. Participants included 97 undocumented Hispanic women, who either were pregnant or had a baby within the past 12 months, and health care providers. Most women came from Mexico (90.7%). They tended to be young, to have low educational attainment, to be homemakers, to have a high number of members in their households, to be financially supported by their spouses, and to live at or below the poverty line. The average length of time that they had been in the United States and Memphis were 42 and 21 months respectively. With regard to access to health care, undocumented Hispanics who migrated to the Memphis area lacked adequate prenatal and delivery care, and we estimated that the demand for prenatal care in this population will increase over 60% in the next five years.
  • Author List

  • Scarinci IC; Klesges RC; Kovach KW; Chang CF
  • Start Page

  • 300
  • End Page

  • 304
  • Volume

  • 94
  • Issue

  • 8