Effects of sodium nitrite on ischemia-reperfusion injury in the rat kidney

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play a key role in the pathophysiology of renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Recent studies have shown that nitrite (NO2-) serves as an endogenous source of nitric oxide (NO), particularly in the presence of hypoxia and acidosis. Nanomolar concentrations of NO2- reduce injury following I/R in the liver and heart in vivo. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of NO2- in renal I/R injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a unilateral nephrectomy followed by 45 min of ischemia of the contralateral kidney or sham surgery under isoflurane anesthesia. Animals received normal saline, sodium NO2-, or sodium nitrate (NO3-; 1.2 nmol/g body wt ip) at 22.5 min after induction of ischemia or 15 min before ischemia. A separate set of animals received saline, NO2-, or NO3- (0.12, 1.2, or 12 nmol/g body wt iv) 45 min before ischemia. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were increased following I/R injury but were not significantly different among treatment groups at 24 and 48 h after acute renal injury. Interestingly, NO3- administration appeared to worsen renal injury. Histological scoring for loss of brush border, tubular necrosis, and red blood cell extravasation showed no significant differences among the treatment groups. The results indicate that, contrary to the protective effects of NO2- in I/R injury of the liver and heart, NO 2- does not provide protection in renal I/R injury and suggest a unique metabolism of NO2- in the kidney. Copyright © 2006 the American Physiological Society.
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Basireddy M; Isbell TS; Teng X; Patel RP; Agarwal A
  • Volume

  • 290
  • Issue

  • 4