The emerging role of gasotransmitters in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the second largest contributor to global mortality caused by an infectious agent after HIV. In infected host cells, Mtb is faced with a harsh intracellular environment including hypoxia and the release of nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) by immune cells. Hypoxia, NO and CO induce a state of in vitro dormancy where Mtb senses these gases via the DosS and DosT heme sensor kinase proteins, which in turn induce a set of ∼47 genes, known as the Mtb Dos dormancy regulon. On the contrary, both iNOS and HO-1, which produce NO and CO, respectively, have been shown to be important against mycobacterial disease progression. In this review, we discuss the impact of O , NO and CO on Mtb physiology and in host responses to Mtb infection as well as the potential role of another major endogenous gas, hydrogen sulfide (H S), in Mtb pathogenesis. 2 2
  • Published In

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Chinta KC; Saini V; Glasgow JN; Mazorodze JH; Rahman MA; Reddy D; Lancaster JR; Steyn AJC
  • Start Page

  • 28
  • End Page

  • 41
  • Volume

  • 59