Predicting Intentions to Eat a Healthful Diet by College Baseball Players: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Objective: To assess factors important to college baseball players regarding intention to eat a healthful diet within the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design: A survey based on the Theory of Planned Behavior was administered during the 2006 summer league season from 5 of the Northern Division teams of the Coastal Plain League. Participants: Male undergraduate college baseball players (mean [standard deviation (SD)] age 20.25 [1.12]). Phenomenon of Interest: Prediction of behavioral intention to eat a healthful diet. Analysis: Regression analysis was used to assess how well the variables of the Theory of Planned Behavior predicted behavioral intention to eat a healthful diet. Results: Attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavior control variables accounted for 72% of the variance in behavioral intention to eat a healthful diet. Attitude had the greatest influence on intention (β = .383, P < .001), followed by subjective norms (β = .291, P < .001), and perceived behavioral control (β = .269, P < .001). Athletes' daily schedule and their perception of the impact of a healthful diet on their focus and concentration had the biggest impact on intention to eat healthful food. Conclusions and Implications: University athletic administration must emphasize providing access to healthful food, especially during the season, both at home and while traveling to games. © 2009 Society for Nutrition Education.
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Pawlak R; Malinauskas B; Rivera D
  • Start Page

  • 334
  • End Page

  • 339
  • Volume

  • 41
  • Issue

  • 5