Predictors of outcomes for women with cervical carcinoma

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Background. To determine the impact of race and other factors on the management and outcomes of women treated for cervical cancer in a rural state. Methods. Following IRB approval, a retrospective review identified 434 eligible women treated for cervical cancer from 1994 to 2000. Collected data included: demographics, clinicopathologic data, primary and adjuvant therapy, recurrence, and survival. Statistical analyses were performed with the Chi-square test, Kaplan-Meier method, and Cox regression. Results. 304 (70%) of the women were white and 130 (30%) were non-white. Non-whites were more likely to present with advanced stage disease [Stage IIB-IVB] (25% vs. 13%; P < 0.01). Whites were more likely to smoke, be married, be employed, and have private insurance. Non-whites were more likely to have medical co-morbidities such as diabetes and hypertension. Although whites with early stage disease were more likely to undergo surgery as their primary therapy than non-whites (93% vs. 84%; P < 0.01), survival was similar. Survival outcomes for advanced stage disease were similar between groups. Conclusions. Non-whites diagnosed with cervical cancer are more likely to present with advanced stage disease than whites; however, overall survival was similar between groups. Non-whites with early stage disease were more likely to receive primary radiation therapy than whites. The decision to use radiation therapy vs. surgery does not appear to have a detrimental effect on overall survival, but may impact quality of life. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Published In

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Leath CA; Straughn JM; Kirby TO; Huggins A; Partridge EE; Parham GP
  • Start Page

  • 432
  • End Page

  • 436
  • Volume

  • 99
  • Issue

  • 2