Chlamydial and gonococcal infections in women seeking pregnancy testing at family-planning clinics

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Objective: The objective of the study was to assess genital chlamydia and gonorrhea prevalence and associated predictors in women seeking pregnancy testing. Study Design: The study included analysis of demographics and results of pregnancy, chlamydia, and gonorrhea testing in 1465 females seeking pregnancy testing at family-planning clinics in South Carolina. Results: The median age was 22 years (range 16-45), the race distribution consisted of 53% African Americans and 47% Caucasians, and 64% of subjects were pregnant. Chlamydia and gonorrhea were detected in 12% and 2% of subjects, respectively. Predictors of chlamydia and gonorrhea included younger age and African American race. Chlamydia and gonorrhea prevalence did not differ in pregnant vs nonpregnant subjects. Conclusion: Chlamydia prevalence was high and gonorrhea prevalence low in women seeking pregnancy testing at family-planning clinics, and both were predicted by younger age and African American race but not pregnancy status. Because the majority seeking pregnancy testing were pregnant, chlamydia testing in this population at risk for chlamydia-associated morbidity has potential benefit. © 2008 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Geisler WM; James AB
  • Start Page

  • 502.e1
  • End Page

  • 502.e4
  • Volume

  • 198
  • Issue

  • 5