Intrauterine growth retardation and preterm delivery: prenatal risk factors in an indigent population

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Prenatally ascertained risk factors for low birth weight were evaluated in a population of 17,000 indigent women for their specific effect on intrauterine growth retardation and on the rate of preterm delivery. In a univariate analysis, intrauterine growth retardation occurred more frequently in women who were black, single, primiparous, <17 or >30 years old, short, thin, had a previous preterm delivery, consumed alcohol, took drugs, or gained limited weight. Preterm delivery occurred significantly more frequently in women who were black, single, thin, <17 or >30 years old, had less than a twelfth grade education, or gained limited weight. In logistic regression analyses, race, parity, maternal age, a history of preterm delivery, smoking, short stature, low weight, and low weight gain remained significant risk factors of intrauterine growth retardation. Of these factors, smoking, short stature, low weight, and low weight gain showed the greatest correlation. Factors significantly related to preterm delivery included black race, single marital status, younger or older ages, previous preterm delivery, smoking, low weight, and very low or high weight gain. A previous preterm delivery and very low maternal weight had the greatest correlation. Identification of specific risk factors of both intrauterine growth retardation and preterm delivery should aid in the development of strategies to reduce the prevalence of these conditions. © 1990.
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Wen SW; Goldenberg RL; Cutter GR; Hoffman HJ; Cliver SP
  • Start Page

  • 213
  • End Page

  • 218
  • Volume

  • 162
  • Issue

  • 1