Breast papillomas in the United States: single institution data on underrepresented minorities with a multi-institutional update on incidence

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Purpose: To assess the percentage of papillomas from all biopsies performed, comparing differences in patient age and race at a single institution. To assess trends in biopsied papillomas at institutions throughout the United States (US). Methods: This is a HIPPA-compliant IRB-approved single-institution (Southern1) retrospective review to assess race and age of all-modality-biopsied non-malignant papillomas as a percentage of all biopsies (percentage papillomas calculated as papilloma biopsies/all biopsies) from January 2012 to December 2019. To assess national variation, several academic or large referral centers were contacted to provide data regarding papilloma percentages, biopsy modalities, and trends in case numbers. Trends were estimated using the method of analysis of variance (ANOVA). Comparisons of differences in trends were assessed. Results: Southern1 institution demonstrated a significant association between race and percentage of papillomas (p < 0.0001). After adjustment for multiple comparisons with Bonferroni correction at 5% type I family error, the percentage of biopsied papillomas in Black and Asian patients remained significantly higher than in White patients (p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0032, respectively) using a Chi-square test. The regional variation in percentage of papillomas was found to be 3–9%. Southern1 institution showed a 7-year significant trend of increase in percentage of papillomas. Other institutions showed a decreasing trend (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Black and Asian women had significantly higher papilloma percentages compared to white patients in our single institution review. This institution also showed a statistically significant trend of increasing percentage papillomas from 2012 to 2019. Multi-institutional survey found regional variation in percentage papillomas, ranging from 3% to 9%.
  • Published In

  • Clinical Imaging  Journal
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Woodard S; Zamora K; Allen E; Choe AI; Chan TL; Li Y; Khorjekar GR; Tirada N; Destounis S; Weidenhaft MC
  • Start Page

  • 21
  • End Page

  • 28
  • Volume

  • 82