Interpersonal Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms, and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide in Women Seeking Shelter from Intimate Partner Violence

Academic Article

Abstract

  • This study examined how trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms of reexperiencing, avoidance, numbing, dysphoric arousal, and anxious arousal relate to the major components of the interpersonal theory of suicide; namely, thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and the acquired capability for suicide. A sample of 137 women seeking shelter from intimate partner violence completed self-report assessments. Symptoms of dysphoric arousal and numbing were uniquely and positively associated with thwarted belongingness. Numbing symptoms were uniquely and positively associated with perceived burdensomeness. Reexperiencing and anxious arousal symptoms were uniquely but negatively associated with the acquired capability for suicide. Interpersonal trauma was also positively associated with acquired capability, but only when examined independently. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms of dysphoric arousal and numbing symptoms might complement brief screenings for acute suicide risk and can help inform in-shelter activities as well as postshelter treatment recommendations to decrease suicide risk for shelter-seeking women.
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Smith PN; Kuhlman S; Wolford-Clevenger C; Faulk R; D’Amato D; Granato S
  • Start Page

  • 812
  • End Page

  • 830
  • Volume

  • 25
  • Issue

  • 8