Endoscopic Mitral Repair for Degenerative Mitral Regurgitation: Effect of Disease Complexity on Short- and Mid-term Outcomes

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Background: We set out to compare in a prospective cohort study the mid-term clinical and echocardiographic outcomes of mini-mitral repair for simple (posterior prolapse) vs complex regurgitation (anterior/bileaflet prolapse). Methods: A total of 245 consecutive patients underwent mini-mitral repair for severe degenerative mitral regurgitation through a right, endoscopic approach (n = 145 simple, n = 100 complex). The most common repair technique was annuloplasty + artificial chordae (84%, n = 121 for simple vs 88%, n = 88 for complex, P = 0.3). Patients were prospectively followed for a maximal duration of 9 years. Patients’ characteristics were well balanced between groups. Results: The 30-day/in-hospital mortality was similar (0%, n = 0 simple vs 1%, n = 1 complex, P = 0.2). Both groups had similar rates of early postoperative complications: myocardial infarction (1.4%, n = 2 vs 0%, n = 0, P = 0.2), neurologic complications (1.4%, n = 2 vs 0%, n = 0, P = 0.2), reoperation for bleeding (0.7%, n = 1 vs 3%, n = 3, P = 0.2), intensive care unit length of stay (1 interquartile range, 1-1 days vs 1 interquartile range, 1-1 days, P = 0.7). Late survival (88% for simple vs 92% for complex, P = 0.4) was similar between groups. Cumulative incidence of late reoperation at 6 years is 0% for both groups (subdistribution hazard ratio = 1, P = 1). There was no difference in recurrent mitral regurgitation greater than 2+ at each year after surgery up to 6 years postoperatively. Conclusion: Mitral repair using an endoscopic, minimally invasive approach yields excellent mid-term outcomes regardless of disease complexity.
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Pubmed Id

  • 22161931
  • Author List

  • Hage F; Hage A; Manian U; Tzemos N; Chu MWA
  • Start Page

  • 337
  • End Page

  • 343
  • Volume

  • 2
  • Issue

  • 5