Characteristics of mycoplasma genitalium urogenital infections in a diverse patient sample from the United States: Results from the aptima mycoplasma genitalium evaluation study (AMES)

Academic Article

Abstract

  • © 2020 Manhart et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. Data from a large prospective multicenter clinical validation study of a nucleic acid amplification in vitro diagnostic test for Mycoplasma genitalium were analyzed to describe the prevalence of M. genitalium infection, risk factors, and disease associations in female and male patients seeking care in diverse geographic regions of the United States. Among 1,737 female and 1,563 male participants, the overall prevalence of M. genitalium infection was 10.3% and was significantly higher in persons ages 15 to 24 years than in persons ages 35 to 39 years (for females, 19.8% versus 4.7% [odds ratio {OR} = 5.05; 95% confidence interval {CI} = 3.01 to 8.46]; for males, 16.5% versus 9.4% [OR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.20 to 3.02]). The risk for M. genitalium infection was higher in black than in white participants (for females, 12.0% versus 6.8% [OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.30 to 2.72]; for males, 12.9% versus 6.9% [OR = 2.02; 95% CI = 1.38 to 2.96]) and higher in non-Hispanic than in Hispanic participants (for females, 11.2% versus 6.0% [OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.25 to 3.10]; for males, 11.6% versus 6.8% [OR = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.14 to 2.85]). Participants reporting urogenital symptoms had a significantly elevated risk of M. genitalium infection compared to that for asymptomatic individuals (for females, OR = 1.53 [95% CI = 1.09 to 2.14]; for males, OR = 1.42 [95% CI = 1.02 to 1.99]). Women diagnosed with vaginitis and cervicitis had a higher prevalence of M. genitalium infection than women without those diagnoses, although this was statistically significant only for vaginitis (for vaginitis, OR = 1.88 [95% CI = 1.37 to 2.58]; for cervicitis, OR = 1.42 [95% CI = 0.61 to 2.96]). A diagnosis of urethritis in men was also significantly associated with M. genitalium infection (OR = 2.97; 95% CI = 2.14 to 4.13). Few characteristics distinguished asymptomatic from symptomatic M. genitalium infections. These results from persons seeking care in the United States suggest that M. genitalium infection should be considered in young persons presenting with urogenital symptoms.
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    Author List

  • Manhart LE; Gaydos CA; Taylor SN; Lillis RA; Hook EW; Klausner JD; Remillard CV; Love M; McKinney B; Getman DK
  • Volume

  • 58
  • Issue

  • 7