Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Importance: Dementia (also known as major neurocognitive disorder) is defined by a significant decline in 1 or more cognitive domains that interferes with a person's independence in daily activities. Dementia affects an estimated 2.4 to 5.5 million individuals in the United States, and its prevalence increases with age. Objective: To update its 2014 recommendation, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a review of the evidence on screening for cognitive impairment, including mild cognitive impairment and mild to moderate dementia, in community-dwelling adults, including those 65 years or older residing in independent living facilities. Population: This recommendation applies to community-dwelling older adults 65 years or older, without recognized signs or symptoms of cognitive impairment. Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is lacking, and the balance of benefits and harms of screening for cognitive impairment cannot be determined. Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for cognitive impairment in older adults. (I statement).
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Owens DK; Davidson KW; Krist AH; Barry MJ; Cabana M; Caughey AB; Doubeni CA; Epling JW; Kubik M; Landefeld CS
  • Start Page

  • 757
  • End Page

  • 763
  • Volume

  • 323
  • Issue

  • 8