Cutaneous Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among All Skin and Soft-tissue Infections in Two Geographically Distant Pediatric Emergency Departments

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Objectives: To describe the culture results of cutaneous infections affecting otherwise healthy children presenting to two pediatric emergency departments (EDs) in the southeastern United States and southern California. Methods: Medical records of 920 children who presented to the pediatric EDs with skin infections and abscesses (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes 680.0-686.9) during 2003 were reviewed. Chronically ill children with previously described risk factors for community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) were excluded. Data abstracted included the type of infection; the site of infection; and, if a culture was obtained, the organism grown, along with their corresponding sensitivities. Results: Of the 270 children who had bacterial cultures obtained, 60 (22%) were CA-MRSA-positive cultures, most cultured from abscesses (80%). Of all abscesses cultured, CA-MRSA grew in more than half (53%). All CA-MRSA isolates tested were sensitive to vancomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, rifampin, and gentamicin. One isolate at each center was resistant to clindamycin. The sensitivities at both institutions were similar. Conclusions: The authors conclude that CA-MRSA is responsible for most abscesses and that the pattern of CA-MRSA infections in these geographically distant pediatric EDs is similar. These data suggest that optimal diagnostic and management strategies for CA-MRSA will likely be widely applicable if results from a larger, more collaborative study yield similar findings. ¬© 2007 Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.
  • Authors

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    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Hasty MB; Klasner A; Kness S; Denmark TK; Ellis D; Herman MI; Brown L
  • Start Page

  • 35
  • End Page

  • 40
  • Volume

  • 14
  • Issue

  • 1