Follow-up care among HIV-infected pregnant women in Mississippi

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Background: Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) indicate that reproductive-age black women in the Southeast are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. There are few data describing HIV infection, pregnancies, and follow-up care in this population. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed at the Perinatal HIV Service at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Mississippi, to identify HIV-infected women ≥18 years of age with deliveries from 1999 to 2006. Optimal follow-up was defined as at least two follow-up visits with an HIV provider within 1 year of delivery. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with optimal adherence. Results: We identified 274 women with 297 total deliveries. Median age was 25, and 89% were black. Only 37% of women had two or more visits with an HIV provider in the postpartum year. On univariate analysis, presentation before the third trimester was associated with optimal follow-up (p=0.04). On multivariate analyses, presentation before the third trimester was the only variable associated with optimal follow-up (odds ratio [OR] 2.1, p=0.02). Conclusions: The poor follow-up rates in this growing population highlight the critical need for research and development of targeted interventions to improve rates of retention in care, particularly in women with late trimester presentation. Copyright © 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
  • Authors

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    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Rana AI; Gillani FS; Flanigan TP; Nash BT; Beckwith CG
  • Start Page

  • 1863
  • End Page

  • 1867
  • Volume

  • 19
  • Issue

  • 10