Comparison of A1C and fasting glucose criteria to diagnose diabetes among U.S. adults

Academic Article

Abstract

  • OBJECTIVE - To compare A1C and fasting glucose for the diagnosis of diabetes among U.S. adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - This study included 6,890 adults (≥20 years of age) from the 1999-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey without a self-reported history of diabetes who had fasted ≥9 h. A1C ≥6.5% and fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dl were used, separately, to define diabetes. RESULTS- Overall, 1.8% of U.S. adults had A1C ≥6.5% and fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dl, 0.5% had A1C ≥6.5% and fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dl, and 1.8% had A1C ≥6.5% and fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dl. Compared with individuals with A1C ≥6.5% and fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dl, individuals with A1C ≥6.5% and fasting glucose <126 mg/dl were younger, more likely to be non-Hispanic black, had lower Hb levels, and had higher C-reactive protein. CONCLUSIONS - A1C ≥6.5% demonstrates reasonable agreement with fasting glucose for diagnosing diabetes among U.S. adults. © 2010 by the American Diabetes Association.
  • Authors

    Published In

  • Diabetes Care  Journal
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Carson AP; Reynolds K; Fonseca VA; Muntner P
  • Start Page

  • 95
  • End Page

  • 97
  • Volume

  • 33
  • Issue

  • 1