Evidence of disturbed sleep in children with eosinophilic esophagitis and persistent epigastric pain

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Objective To determine whether the experience of persistent epigastric pain is associated with sleep disturbances in children with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). We hypothesized that children with EoE and persistent epigastric pain would (1) self-report greater current and worst pain severity, and (2) experience more disturbed sleep on objective and subjective measures in comparison with children with EoE but no persistent pain and healthy children. Methods Fifty children with EoE were recruited for this cross-sectional study, of which 24 (48%) reported experiencing persistent epigastric pain. The remaining 26 (52%) children with EoE denied experiencing persistent pain. An additional 25 healthy children without EoE or persistent pain were included. All children provided severity ratings of current pain and worst pain experienced over the past week. Children then completed 12 consecutive nights of ambulatory sleep monitoring via actigraphy in the home. Caregivers provided information regarding their child's sleep patterns and internalizing symptoms. Results Children with EoE and persistent pain reported significantly greater severity of current pain (p<.001) and worst pain over the past week (p<.001) compared with EoE without persistent pain and healthy children. Compared with the other groups, children with EoE and persistent pain also demonstrated greater actigraphic sleep disturbances, lower sleep efficiency (p.004) and greater wake after sleep onset (p.034). Conclusions This study provides novel evidence that a significant proportion of children with EoE experience persistent symptoms of epigastric pain. Persistent pain was associated with significant sleep disturbances in children with EoE.
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    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Lynch MK; Dimmitt RA; Goodin BR
  • Start Page

  • 331
  • End Page

  • 341
  • Volume

  • 43
  • Issue

  • 3