The Ethics of Predatory Journals

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Predatory journals operate as vanity presses, typically charging large submission or publication fees and requiring little peer review. The consequences of such journals are wide reaching, affecting the integrity of the legitimate journals they attempt to imitate, the reputations of the departments, colleges, and universities of their contributors, the actions of accreditation bodies, the reputations of their authors, and perhaps even the generosity of academic benefactors. Using a stakeholder analysis, our study of predatory journals suggests that most stakeholders gain little in the short run from such publishing and only the editors or owners of these journals benefit in the long run. We also discuss counter-measures that academic and administrative faculty can employ to thwart predatory publishing.
  • Authors

    Published In

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • McLeod A; Savage A; Simkin MG
  • Start Page

  • 121
  • End Page

  • 131
  • Volume

  • 153
  • Issue

  • 1