Obesity-Associated Hypertension: the Upcoming Phenotype in African-American Women

Academic Article

Abstract

  • © 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Purpose of Review: The present obesity epidemic particularly affects African-American women. Whether the obesity epidemic will alter the hypertension phenotype in African-American women is entertained. Recent Findings: The prevalence of morbid obesity is steadily increasing in African-American women, who are prone to developing hypertension (HTN) even in the absence of obesity. The obesity-associated hypertension phenotype is characterized by marked sympathetic nervous system activation and resistance/refractoriness to antihypertensive therapy. Weight loss achieved through lifestyle interventions and pharmacotherapy has a modest and rarely sustained antihypertensive effect. In contrast, bariatric surgery has a sustained antihypertensive effect, as evidenced by normalization of hypertension or lessening of antihypertensive therapy. Summary: The prevalence of HTN and its obesity-associated phenotype is likely to increase in African-American women over the next decades. Obese African-American women may be increasingly referred for bariatric surgery when hypertension remains uncontrolled despite lifestyle interventions and pharmacological therapy for weight loss and blood pressure (BP) control.
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Pubmed Id

  • 15122203
  • Author List

  • Samson R; Qi A; Jaiswal A; Le Jemtel TH; Oparil S
  • Volume

  • 19
  • Issue

  • 5