Effects of bat grip on baseball hitting kinematics

Academic Article

Abstract

  • A motion system collected 120-Hz data from 14 baseball adult hitters using normal and choke-up bat grips. Six swings were digitized for each hitter, and temporal and kinematic parameters were calculated. Compared with a normal grip, the choke-up grip resulted in 1) less time during stride phase and swing; 2) the upper torso more opened at lead foot contact; 3) the pelvis more closed and less bat linear velocity at bat-ball contact; 4) less range of motion of the upper torso and pelvis during swing; 5) greater elbow flexion at lead foot contact; and 6) greater peak right elbow extension angular velocity. The decreased time during the stride phase when using a choke-up grip implies that hitters quicken their stride when they choke up. Less swing time duration and less upper torso and pelvis rotation range of motion using the choke-up grip supports the belief of many coaches and players that using a choke-up grip results in a "quicker" swing. However, the belief that using a choke-up grip leads to a faster moving bat was not supported by the results of this study. © 2009 Human Kinetics, Inc.
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Escamilla RF; Fleisig GS; DeRenne C; Taylor MK; Moorman CT; Imamura R; Barakatt E; Andrews JR
  • Start Page

  • 203
  • End Page

  • 209
  • Volume

  • 25
  • Issue

  • 3