Maternal obesity: Association with perinatal outcomes

Academic Article

Abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To assess adverse effects of increased maternal weight. STUDY DESIGN: A computerized database was utilized to review perinatal outcotnes of women with singletons delivered at our institution between 1991 and 1996. Women were stratified based on their first prenatal visit weight (£200 Ib, 201-299 Ib, =?300 Ib). Selected maternal and neonatal outcomes were evaluated for each group. RESULTS: Our study population included 18,511 (85%) women 200 Ib, 3,089 (14%) who were 201-299 Ib, and 219 (1%) women £300 Ib. Those &300 Ib or 201-299 Ib were older (27.4 vs 25.1 vs 22.9 yrs, p = .001) and more often nmltiparous (66.7 vs 66.4 vs 55.4%, p < .001) than those 200 Ib. Selected maternal and neonatal outcomes differed among the three groups: MATERIAL WEIGHT Outcome £200 201-299 >300 P Gestational DM (%) 2.0 6.5 11.0 <.001 Overt DM (%) .52 1.9 5.0 <.001 Chronic HTX ("/,) 1.4 5.4 11.6 <.001 Preeclampsia/PIH (%) Primipara 7.3 13.5 16.4 <.OOI Mullipara 3.0 6.8 3.4 <.001 Cesarean delivery- (%) 13.5 23.0 35.2 <.001 BW >400()g (%) 5.3 14.0 16.9 <.001 Endometritis (%) Vaginal delivery 3.2 3.4 2.1 <.()()! Cesarean section 23.4 19.5 24.0 <.001 Fetal death (%) 1.1 1.6 2.3 .017 Neonatal death ('%) .61 .94 1.8 .013 Exclusion of women with overt DM or chronic HTN revealed similar results in regard to fetal death and neonatal death. CONCLUSION: In our population, women at their first prenatal visit who weighed >200 Ib, especially those 300 Ibs, had increased medical complications and adverse perinatal outcomes.
  • Authors

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    Author List

  • Kimberlin UF; Hauth JC; Brumfidd CG; Dubanf M
  • Volume

  • 176
  • Issue

  • 1 PART II