Intracoronary infusion of catecholamines causes focal arrhythmias in pigs

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Catecholamines Cause Focal Arrhythmias. Background: Acute ischemia causes myriad changes including increased catecholamines. We tested the hypothesis that elevated catecholamines alone are arrhythmogenic. Methods and Results: A 504 electrode sock was placed over both ventricles in six open-chest pigs. During control infusion of saline through a catheter in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD), no sustained arrhythmias occurred, and the refractory period estimated by the activation recovery interval (ARI) was 175 ± 14 ms in the LAD bed below the catheter. After infusion of isoproterenol at 0.1 μg/kg/min through the catheter, the ARI in this bed was significantly reduced to 109 ± 10 ms. A sharp gradient of refractoriness of 43 ± 10 ms was at the border of the perfused bed. Sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia occurred after drug infusion in the perfused bed or near its boundary in all animals with a cycle length of 329 ± 26 ms and a focal origin. The maximum slope of the ARI restitution curve at the focal origins of the tachyarrhythmias was always <1 (0.62 ± 0.15). Similar results with a focal arrhythmia origin occurred in two additional pigs in which intramural mapping was performed with 36 plunge needle electrodes in the left ventricular perfused bed. Conclusion: Regional elevation of a catecholamine, which is one of the alterations produced by acute ischemia, can by itself cause tachyarrhythmias. These arrhythmias are closely associated with a shortened refractory period and a large gradient of the spatial distribution of refractoriness but not with a steep restitution curve. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Doppalapudi H; Jin Q; Dosdall DJ; Qin H; Walcott GP; Killingsworth CR; Smith WM; Ideker RE; Huang J
  • Start Page

  • 963
  • End Page

  • 970
  • Volume

  • 19
  • Issue

  • 9