Impact of preceding flu-like illness on the serotype distribution of pneumococcal pneumonia

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Background: Even though the pathogenicity and invasiveness of pneumococcus largely depend on capsular types, the impact of serotypes on post-viral pneumococcal pneumonia is unknown. Methods and Findings: This study was performed to evaluate the impact of capsular serotypes on the development of pneumococcal pneumonia after preceding respiratory viral infections. Patients with a diagnosis of pneumococcal pneumonia were identified. Pneumonia patients were divided into two groups (post-viral pneumococcal pneumonia versus primary pneumococcal pneumonia), and then their pneumococcal serotypes were compared. Nine hundred and nineteen patients with pneumococcal pneumonia were identified during the study period, including 327 (35.6%) cases with post-viral pneumococcal pneumonia and 592 (64.4%) cases with primary pneumococcal pneumonia. Overall, serotypes 3 and 19A were the most prevalent, followed by serotypes 19F, 6A, and 11A/11E. Although relatively uncommon (33 cases, 3.6%), infrequently colonizing invasive serotypes (4, 5, 7F/7A, 8, 9V/9A, 12F, and 18C) were significantly associated with preceding respiratory viral infections (69.7%, P<,0.01). Multivariate analysis revealed several statistically significant risk factors for postviral pneumococcal pneumonia: immunodeficiency (OR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10-2.53), chronic lung diseases (OR 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09-1.93) and ICI serotypes (OR 4.66; 95% CI, 2.07-10.47). Conclusions: Infrequently colonizing invasive serotypes would be more likely to cause pneumococcal pneumonia after preceding respiratory viral illness, particularly in patients with immunodeficiency or chronic lung diseases. © 2014 Song et al.
  • Authors

    Published In

  • PLoS ONE  Journal
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Song JY; Nahm MH; Cheong HJ; Kim WJ
  • Volume

  • 9
  • Issue

  • 4