Directional cell migration and chemotaxis in wound healing response to PDGF-AA are coordinated by the primary cilium in fibroblasts.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Cell motility and migration play pivotal roles in numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes including development and tissue repair. Cell migration is regulated through external stimuli such as platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA), a key regulator in directional cell migration during embryonic development and a chemoattractant during postnatal migratory responses including wound healing. We previously showed that PDGFRalpha signaling is coordinated by the primary cilium in quiescent cells. However, little is known about the function of the primary cilium in cell migration. Here we used micropipette analysis to show that a normal chemosensory response to PDGF-AA in fibroblasts requires the primary cilium. In vitro and in vivo wound healing assays revealed that in ORPK mouse (IFT88(Tg737Rpw)) fibroblasts, where ciliary assembly is defective, chemotaxis towards PDGF-AA is absent, leading to unregulated high speed and uncontrolled directional cell displacement during wound closure, with subsequent defects in wound healing. These data suggest that in coordination with cytoskeletal reorganization, the fibroblast primary cilium functions via ciliary PDGFRalpha signaling to monitor directional movement during wound healing.
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    Keywords

  • Animals, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, Chemotaxis, Cilia, Fibroblasts, Mice, NIH 3T3 Cells, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor, Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor alpha, Signal Transduction, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, Wound Healing
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Schneider L; Cammer M; Lehman J; Nielsen SK; Guerra CF; Veland IR; Stock C; Hoffmann EK; Yoder BK; Schwab A
  • Start Page

  • 279
  • End Page

  • 292
  • Volume

  • 25
  • Issue

  • 2-3