Localization of FCGR1 encoding Fcγ receptor class I in primates: Molecular evidence for two pericentric inversions during the evolution of human chromosome 1

Academic Article

Abstract

  • The human high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin G, FcγRI (FCGR1), is encoded by a family of three genes that share over 95% sequence homology. Curiously, the three genes in this recently duplicated gene family flank the centromere of human chromosome 1, with FCGR1B located at 1p12 and both FCGR1A and FCGR1C located at 1q21. We have previously speculated that a pericentric inversion could account for the separation of the genes in the FCGR1 family and explain their current chromosomal location. Here we present evidence, obtained through fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, that in the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) and baboon (Papio papio) FCGR1 is located adjacent to the centromere on the chromosomal arm with greatest homology to human 1p, whereas in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) it is located adjacent to the centromere on the chromosomal arm with greatest homology to human 1q. The separation of the FCGR1 gene family in humans suggests that the location of a second pericentric inversion, known to distinguish the human from the chimpanzee chromosome 1, is within the FCGR1 gene family. This finding refines the assignment of homology between the human and chimpanzee chromosomes 1.
  • Published In

    Author List

  • Maresco DL; Blue LE; Culley LL; Kimberly RP; Anderson CL; Theil KS
  • Start Page

  • 71
  • End Page

  • 74
  • Volume

  • 82
  • Issue

  • 1-2