Factors associated with intention to vaccinate a daughter against HPV: a statewide survey in Alabama.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • PURPOSE: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Adolescent and young adults aged 15-24 were estimated to account for three quarters of new infections in 2000. Two HPV vaccines are currently available. The vaccine is recommended for girls aged 11-12 years. Previous research has indicated that African-American and Asian-American parents are less likely than Caucasians to vaccinate their daughters. This investigation examines the relationship between demographic, medical, and behavioral risk factors for HPV vaccine acceptability among Alabama residents. METHODS: The cross-sectional survey was conducted using random digit dialing. Eligible participants were female caregivers of adolescent girls between the ages of 10 and 14 years. Factors related to intention to vaccinate a daughter within the next six months were examined using chi-square and logistic regression. RESULTS: Caregivers who were informed about HPV vaccination from a health care provider were more likely to intend to vaccinate their daughter within the next six months compared with caregivers who did not report this source of information (OR = 3.59, 95% CI = 1.52, 8.45). Race, education, county of residence, child's age, religious attendance, knowledge and history of HPV, perceived susceptibility, and severity of infection were not significantly related to intention to vaccinate against HPV. CONCLUSION: Caregivers who were informed of the vaccine by their health care provider were more likely to vaccinate their adolescent daughters. Provider attitudes and caregiver education is an essential link to improvement of HPV vaccination uptake in Alabama.
  • Keywords

  • Adolescent, Adult, Alabama, Caregivers, Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Intention, Logistic Models, Middle Aged, Mothers, Multivariate Analysis, Papillomavirus Infections, Papillomavirus Vaccines, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Socioeconomic Factors, Vaccination
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Litton AG; Desmond RA; Gilliland J; Huh WK; Franklin FA
  • Start Page

  • 166
  • End Page

  • 171
  • Volume

  • 24
  • Issue

  • 3