A study of the relationship between food group recommendations and perceived stress: findings from black women in the Deep South.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Black women in the Deep South experience excess morbidity/mortality from obesity-related diseases, which may be partially attributable to poor diet. One reason for poor dietary intake may be high stress, which has been associated with unhealthy diets in other groups. Limited data are available regarding dietary patterns of black women in the Deep South and to our knowledge no studies have been published exploring relationships between stress and dietary patterns among this group. This cross-sectional study explored the relationship between stress and adherence to food group recommendations among black women in the Deep South. Participants (n = 355) provided demographic, anthropometric, stress (PSS-10), and dietary (NCI ASA-24 hour recall) data. Participants were obese (BMI = 36.5 kg/m(2)) and reported moderate stress (PSS-10 score = 16) and minimal adherence to Dietary Guidelines for Americans food group recommendations (1/3 did not meet recommendations for any food group). Participants reporting higher stress had higher BMIs than those reporting lower stress. There was no observed relationship between stress and dietary intake in this sample. Based on these study findings, which are limited by potential misreporting of dietary intake and limited variability in stress measure outcomes, there is insufficient evidence to support a relationship between stress and dietary intake.
  • Published In

  • Journal of Obesity  Journal
  • Keywords

  • Adult, African Americans, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alabama, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diet, Diet Surveys, Energy Intake, Feeding Behavior, Female, Guidelines as Topic, Health Promotion, Humans, Middle Aged, Nutrition Policy, Obesity, Patient Compliance, Stress, Psychological, United States
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Carson TL; Desmond R; Hardy S; Townsend S; Ard JD; Meneses K; Partridge EE; Baskin ML
  • Start Page

  • 203164
  • Volume

  • 2015