Lifestyle interventions to reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes

Academic Article

Abstract

  • There are more than one half million cancer deaths in the United States each year, and one third of these deaths are attributed to suboptimal diet and physical activity practices. Maintaining a healthy weight, staying physically active throughout life, and consuming a healthy diet can substantially reduce the lifetime risk of developing cancer, as well as influence overall health and survival after a cancer diagnosis. The American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines serve as a source document for communication, policy, and community strategies to improve dietary and physical activity patterns among Americans. In 2006, they published updated guidelines for the primary prevention of cancer and guidelines for improving outcomes among cancer survivors through tertiary prevention. These two sets of guidelines have similar recommendations, including: achievement and maintenance of a healthy weight; regular physical activity of at least 30 minutes per day and at least five days per week; a plant-based diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and low in saturated fats and red meats; and moderate alcohol consumption, if at all. Physicians are encouraged to find teachable moments to impart appropriate nutrition, physical activity, and weight management guidance to their patients, and to support policies and programs that can improve these factors in the community to reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes after cancer. Copyright © 2008 American Academy of Family Physicians.
  • Published In

    Author List

  • Demark-Wahnefried W; Rock CL; Patrick K; Byers T
  • Volume

  • 77
  • Issue

  • 11