Energy audit and base case simulation of Ryerson University buildings

Academic Article

Abstract

  • © 2015 ASHRAE. Modeling and simulation of energy consumption in 86% of the Ryerson University (RU) campus buildings is presented. Energy simulation models were developed for 16 major Ryerson University buildings. Commercially available software was used for the prediction of energy use. All of the possible sources and uses of energy in the buildings were accounted for in the modeling and simulation. Simulation result showed that 26% of total energy was used by lighting, 19% of total energy used by plug load, and 4% of total energy was used by miscellaneous equipment. The remaining 51% of energy use was for heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. In addition, the Princeton scorekeeping method (PRISM), a widely used method in energy conservation studies, has been used to analyze the same RU buildings for comparison and verification. The base case simulation result and the Princeton score keeping method result were compared with the Campus Planning actual use bills for electricity, steam and deep lake water cooling (DLWC) demand for the Ryerson campus. The simulation result underpredicted electricity use by 5.7% and steam consumption by 6.3%, while the Princeton scorekeeping method underpredicted electricity use by 2.7%, and overpre dicted steam consumption by 6%. The average energy intensity was determined as 1.04 GJ/m2 (91, 576 Btu/ft2) for the 86% of the total area of Ryerson campus. Sensitivity analysis was conducted by (1) adding a heat recovery system and (2) reducing lighting schedule. As a result, the former analysis predicted an annual energy saving of 5.6% for cooling load and 76% for the heating load, while the latter analysis predicted an annual energy savings of 10%for cooling load and 21% for electricity demand, while the heating load increased by 14%.
  • Authors

    Author List

  • Fung AS; Taherian H; Hossain M; Rahman MZ; Selim MM
  • Start Page

  • 84
  • End Page

  • 98
  • Volume

  • 121