Dietary Interventions for Treatment of Chronic Pain: Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Chronic pain is highly prevalent in the United States, impacting 28.4% of the adult population, or 69.6 million people, as of 2016. Chronic pain is often associated with anxiety, depression, and restrictions in mobility and daily activities, substantially reducing quality of life. Analgesics, especially opioids, are one of the primary pharmaceutical treatment methods for chronic pain. However, prescription opioid misuse and abuse has become increasingly prevalent and concerning, prompting the need for research into alternative treatment methods which avoid the side effects of traditional treatments. Chronic pain is, in part, thought to be the result of oxidative stress and inflammation, and clinical research has indicated links between these conditions and diet. Thus, dietary interventions are a particularly promising therapeutic treatment for chronic pain, with numerous studies suggesting that diet has a noticeable effect on pain as far down as the cellular level. In this review article, data from a number of clinical trials assessing the effect of three diets-antioxidant-rich, low-carbohydrate, and Mediterranean-on oxidative stress and inflammation is compiled and discussed in the context of chronic pain. Clinical data suggests that low-carbohydrate diets and Mediterranean diets both are especially promising dietary interventions.
  • Authors

    Keywords

  • Chronic pain, Diet, Inflammation, Intervention, Low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean diet, Oxidative stress
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Kaushik AS; Strath LJ; Sorge RE
  • Start Page

  • 487
  • End Page

  • 498
  • Volume

  • 9
  • Issue

  • 2