Medication-Taking Behaviors and Perceptions Among Adults With Heart Failure (from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke Study)

Academic Article

Abstract

  • © 2019 Elsevier Inc. Medication regimens in adults with heart failure (HF) are complex which can complicate patient adherence. Individuals with HF frequently use beta blockers (BBs) for multiple indications, including hypertension and HF, but BBs can have significant side effects that may affect their use. We examined medication-taking behaviors and perceptions in individuals with HF with a particular focus on BBs. A mailed survey on medication use was administered to US adults with HF enrolled in the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke study. Among 518 respondents, 357 (69%) reported taking a BB. Nearly half (42%) reported taking ≥10 medications per day. However, 45% indicated that they did not miss any days taking medications, and over 85% reported willingness to take additional medications to prevent further healthcare encounters. Participants’ perceptions of BB symptoms varied, but 56% of those who reported experiencing symptoms did not discuss this with their healthcare providers. Adults who experienced HF hospitalization had higher odds of reporting taking BBs to treat HF (odds ratio 1.51, 95% confidence interval 1.19, 1.91). Adults with hypertension were also likely to report taking BBs to treat high blood pressure (odds ratio 2.42, 95% confidence interval 1.79, 3.26). In conclusion, despite extensive medication regimens, individuals with HF were willing to take additional medications for their disease. Participant recognition of BB use for treating HF and co-morbidities was high, yet many do not report side effects to healthcare providers. In conclusion, better understanding of patients’ medication-taking behaviors and perceptions may facilitate optimization of HF treatments.
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Mefford MT; Sephel A; Van Dyke MK; Chen L; Durant RW; Brown TM; Fifolt M; Maya J; Goyal P; Safford MM
  • Start Page

  • 1667
  • End Page

  • 1674
  • Volume

  • 123
  • Issue

  • 10