Olfactory dysfunction in aging African American and Caucasian men with HIV: A pilot study

Academic Article

Abstract

  • As people age with HIV, olfactory dysfunctions may become more pronounced, especially for African Americans who are predisposed to declines in olfaction. In this cross-sectional study, 34 middle-age and older African American and 17 Caucasian men living with HIV were administered two objective olfactory measures (UPSIT). In the Smell Threshold Test, compared to the HIV-negative age norms, adults living with HIV were significantly less able to detect a lower threshold smell. In the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, compared to the HIV-negative age norms, adults living with HIV were significantly less able to correctly identify odors; furthermore, using such norms, African Americans with HIV were less likely to correctly identify odors compared to Caucasians with HIV. Since the literature indicates that African Americans have a stronger attraction for salty and sweet foods, such olfactory dysfunction may contribute to poor eating habits, potentially predisposing this population to additional health problems.
  • Keywords

  • Olfactory, HIV, Aging
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Vance DE; Cody SL; Nicholson C; Cheatwood J; Morrison S; Fazeli PL