Endoscopic mucosal biopsies are useful in distinguishing granulomatous colitis due to Crohn's disease from tuberculosis

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Background - Intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease are chronic granulomatous disorders that are difficult to differentiate histologically. Aims - To characterise distinctive diagnostic features of tuberculosis and Crohn's disease in mucosal biopsy specimens obtained at colonoscopy. Methods - Selected histological parameters were evaluated retrospectively in a total of 61 biopsy sites from 20 patients with tuberculosis and 112 biopsy sites from 20 patients with Crohn's disease. The patients were chosen on the basis of clinical history, colonoscopic findings, diagnostic histology, and response to treatment. Results - The histological parameters characteristic of tuberculosis were multiple (mean number of granulomas per section: 5.35), large (mean widest diameter: 193 μm), confluent granulomas often with caseating necrosis. Other features were ulcers lined by conglomerate epithelioid histiocytes and disproportionate submucosal inflammation. The features characteristic of Crohn's disease were infrequent (mean number of granulomas per section: 0.75), small (mean widest diameter: 95 μm) granulomas, microgranulomas (defined as poorly organised collections of epithelioid histiocytes), focally enhanced colitis, and a high prevalence of chronic inflammation, even in endoscopically normal appearing areas. Conclusions - The type and frequency of granulomas, presence or absence of ulcers lined by epithelioid histiocytes and microgranulomas, and the distribution of chronic inflammation have been identified as histological parameters that can be used to differentiate tuberculosis and Crohn's disease in mucosal biopsy specimens obtained at colonoscopy.
  • Authors

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Pulimood AB; Ramakrishna BS; Kurian G; Peter S; Patra S; Mathan VI; Mathan MM
  • Start Page

  • 537
  • End Page

  • 541
  • Volume

  • 45
  • Issue

  • 4