Cognitive impairment occurs in children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis: Results from a United States network

Academic Article

Abstract

  • In the largest sample studied to date, we measured cognitive functioning in children and adolescents with pediatric multiple sclerosis (n = 187) as well as those with clinically isolated syndrome (n = 44). Participants were consecutively enrolled from six United States Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Centers of Excellence. Participants had a mean of 14.8 ± 2.6 years of age and an average disease duration of 1.9 ± 2.2 years. A total of 65 (35%) children with multiple sclerosis and 8 (18%) with clinically isolated syndrome met criteria for cognitive impairment. The most frequent areas involved were fine motor coordination (54%), visuomotor integration (50%), and speeded information processing (35%). A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (odds ratio = 3.60, confidence interval = 1.07, 12.36, P =.04) and overall neurologic disability (odds ratio = 1.47, confidence interval = 1.10, 2.10, P =.03) were the only independent predictors of cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment may occur early in these patients, and prompt recognition is critical for their care. © The Author(s) 2013.
  • Published In

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Pubmed Id

  • 10824077
  • Author List

  • Julian L; Serafin D; Charvet L; Ackerson J; Benedict R; Braaten E; Brown T; O'Donnell E; Parrish J; Preston T
  • Start Page

  • 102
  • End Page

  • 107
  • Volume

  • 28
  • Issue

  • 1