Variables predicting the need for a pediatric critical care transport team

Academic Article

Abstract

  • To determine when a pediatric critical care transport team is required to transport a patient to a referral center, this cross-sectional study evaluated 369 consecutive pediatric transports by stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis of six variables: Age, vital signs, seizure activity, current endotracheal intubation, respiratory distress, and respiratory diagnosis. Models were developed for three outcome variables: 1) Major procedures were required in 8.9% of cases. The predicted probability of needing a major procedure was increased for intubated patients (probability of 12.9%), patients <1 year of age with unstable vital signs (12.9%), and patients meeting both these criteria (23.2%). 2) A posttransport assessment of need for a physician on the team was positive in 43% of cases. The probability of needing a physician was increased for intubated patients (probability of 68.8%), patients <1 year of age with unstable vital signs (58.7%), and patients meeting both these criteria (79.9%). 3) Category 1 drugs, ie, medications requiring ICU monitoring, were used in 19% of transports. The probability of this occurring was increased for intubated patients with stable vital signs (probability of 24.7%) and for intubated patients with unstable vital signs (41.4%). None of the other pretransport variables, alone or in pairs, was a significant predictor of any of the three outcome variables. The data indicate that intubation, age, and vital sign status can be used in predicting whether a transport team is needed. © Lippincott-Raven Publishers.
  • Authors

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    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • McCloskey KA; Faries G; King WD; Orr RA; Plouff RT
  • Start Page

  • 1
  • End Page

  • 3
  • Volume

  • 8
  • Issue

  • 1