Trends in eye injury in the United States, 1992-2001.

Academic Article

Abstract

  • PURPOSE: To report the trends of eye injury in the United States from 1992 through 2001. METHODS: The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, and the National Hospital Discharge Survey were used to collect information on eye injuries from 1992 to 2001. Rates of eye injury per 1000 population were calculated according to age, gender, and race. RESULTS: From 1992 through 2001, the overall estimated rate of eye injury ranged from 8.2 to 13.0 per 1000 population. During this period the incidence of eye injury significantly declined overall, in persons aged 39 years and younger, in both genders, and in the black and white populations (all P <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: From 1992 through 2002, the incidence of eye injury in the United States declined overall, in persons aged 39 and younger, in both genders, and in both racial groups. Certain segments of the population, however, continued to be at high risk (i.e., males and persons aged 39 and younger) of eye injury and represent those groups toward whom prevention resources should be directed.
  • Keywords

  • Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Ambulatory Care, Child, Child, Preschool, Eye Injuries, Female, Health Surveys, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Middle Aged, National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.), Sex Distribution, United States
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • McGwin G; Hall TA; Xie A; Owsley C
  • Start Page

  • 521
  • End Page

  • 527
  • Volume

  • 47
  • Issue

  • 2