Survival benefit of kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients

Academic Article

Abstract

  • © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. Objective: To determine the survival benefit of kidney transplantation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Summary Background Data: Although kidney transplantation (KT) has emerged as a viable option for select HIV-infected patients, concerns have been raised that risks of KT in HIV-infected patients are higher than those in their HIV-negative counterparts. Despite these increased risks, KT may provide survival benefit for the HIV-infected patient with ESRD, yet this important clinical question remains unanswered. Methods: Data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients were linked to IMS pharmacy fills (January 1, 2001 to October 1, 2012) to identify and study 1431 HIV-infected KT candidates from the first point of active status on the waiting list. Time-dependent Cox regression was used to establish a counterfactual framework for estimating survival benefit of KT. Results: Adjusted relative risk (aRR) of mortality at 5 years was 79% lower after KT compared with dialysis (aRR 0.21; 95% CI 0.10-0.42; P <0.001), and statistically significant survival benefit was achieved by 194 days of KT. Among patients coinfected with hepatitis C, aRR of mortality at 5 years was 91% lower after KT compared with dialysis (aRR 0.09; 95% CI 0.02-0.46; P < 0.004); however, statistically significant survival benefit was not achieved until 392 days after KT. Conclusions: Evidence suggests that for HIV-infected ESRD patients, KT is associated with a significant survival benefit compared with remaining on dialysis.
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Locke JE; Gustafson S; Mehta S; Reed RD; Shelton B; Maclennan PA; Durand C; Snyder J; Salkowski N; Massie A
  • Start Page

  • 604
  • End Page

  • 608
  • Volume

  • 265
  • Issue

  • 3