A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM)

Academic Article

Abstract

  • © 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a ballroom dance intervention on improving quality of life (QOL) and relationship outcomes in cancer survivors and their partners. Methods: We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with two arms (Restoring Health in You (and Your Partner) through Movement, RHYTHM): (1) immediate dance intervention and (2) delayed intervention (wait-list control). The intervention consisted of 10 private weekly dance lessons and 2 practice parties over 12 weeks. Main outcomes were physical activity (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire), functional capacity (6 Minute Walk Test), QOL (SF-36), Couples’ trust (Dyadic Trust Scale), and other dyadic outcomes. Exit interviews were completed by all participating couples. Results: Thirty-one women survivors (68% breast cancer) and their partners participated. Survivors were 57.9 years old on average and 22.6% African American. Partners had similar characteristics. RHYTHM had significant positive effects on physical activity (p = 0.05), on the mental component of QOL (p = 0.04), on vitality (p = 0.03), and on the dyadic trust scale (p = 0.04). Couples expressed satisfaction with the intervention including appreciating the opportunity to spend time and exercise together. Survivors saw this light-intensity physical activity as easing them into becoming more physically active. Conclusions: Light intensity ballroom dancing has the potential to improve cancer survivors’ QOL. Larger trials are needed to build strong support for this ubiquitous and acceptable activity. Implications for cancer survivors: Ballroom dance may be an important tool for cancer survivors to return to a physically active life and improve QOL and other aspects of their intimate life.
  • Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Pisu M; Demark-Wahnefried W; Kenzik KM; Oster RA; Lin CP; Manne S; Alvarez R; Martin MY
  • Start Page

  • 350
  • End Page

  • 359
  • Volume

  • 11
  • Issue

  • 3