Integrating sonography training into undergraduate medical education: A study of the previous exposure of one institution's incoming residents

Academic Article

Abstract

  • Objectives - Sonography is a crucial and versatile tool within the field of medicine. Recent advancements in technology have led to increased use of point-of-care sonography. We designed a survey to assess prior point-of-care sonography training among incoming interns at an academic teaching hospital. Methods - In 2012 and 2013, we surveyed incoming interns (n = 154 and 145, respectively) regarding point-of-care sonography training received during medical school. The survey questions included formal didactic sessions, bedside instruction, and the use of simulation technology. Results - One-fourth (26.3% in 2012 and 23.4% in 2013) of responding interns reported having never done an ultrasound scan at the bedside. In 2012 and 2013, 55.0% and 55.6% of respondents reported never having done an ultrasound scan in a simulation center, respectively. Interns agreed that sonography education should be provided during medical school. On average, interns disagreed with the statement that sonography should be taught in residency only. There was no significant difference in the sex or general previous experience with sonography across both intern classes. Conclusions - Point-of-care sonography is inconsistently taught in medical school. The interns in our study also thought that sonography education should begin in medical school, and sonography should be taught by using simulation and at the bedside.
  • Published In

    Digital Object Identifier (doi)

    Author List

  • Day J; Davis J; Riesenberg LA; Heil D; Berg K; Davis R; Berg D
  • Start Page

  • 1253
  • End Page

  • 1257
  • Volume

  • 34
  • Issue

  • 7